Archive for October, 2006

Pre-Assessing a Videoconference for Student In-Depth Learning

Most educators plan a videoconference. They determine what they will do during the videoconference such as educator A reads a book and then educator B reads a book. However, they have nothing against which to measure their plan to determine the quality of the learning in a videoconference. Perhaps if they had a way to determine the quality of learning for their videoconference, they might want to make some modifications to improve the quality of learning.

When I do professional development on videoconferencing, we do a videoconference and then we evaluate it. The follow represents a part of the pre-assessment. Unfortunately due to publishing restrictions (I just written a chapter on assessment in videoconferencing which has been accepted in a videoconferencing book.) I cannot show the whole pre-assessment.

Videoconference mini assessment

 

I find that whenever teachers pre-assess a videoconference plan at least a few weeks before a videoconference, they make drastic changes in the videoconference. They raise the quality of learning dramatically once they are aware.

Do you pre-assess the videoconference plan and, therefore, improve student learning?

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Shakespeare Play in English Class: Then and Now with Technology

I grew up in a text based school environment. We read Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream word by word, line by line, page by page, scene by scene. I struggled just to understand what was happening, I usually did not get around to thinking about the themes of the play.

Today’s students can do many technology-infused learning activities.

Many of these technology-infused activities allow the students to be fully engaged and to be doing higher level thinking. Are English teachers in your school text based or technology based? You can use the first column as a check list. Teachers can help their students to better understand any play through technology.

Shakespeare with technology

Fun or Learning: Your Choice in Videoconferencing

I recently watched a videoconference between two elementary schools. During the thirty minute videoconference, the educators only asked one question (a prediction one) to the students. The educator accepted about three answers and then moved on; probably the students responded for a total of about thirty seconds. So 30 seconds out of 30 minutes x 60 seconds = 30/1800 = 1/600 = 1% of student time.

Did they have fun? Sure, they did. The two educators commented on the fun factor.

A recent math study revealed that fun is not necessarily connected to learning; in fact, the more fun students rated math, the worse they did in math. The USA was in the middle range on this.

I do not think that it is an learning and fun is an either or situation but we have to insure that learning is the priority.

FUN…………………………………………………………….LEARNING

LEARNING ………………………………………….

.

.

FUN

Professional Development Using Technology: From Dream to Disaster

A school district recently had training on podcasting. The attendees were all excited. Someone asked if she could create podcasts on the computers in her school. The school technician responded that her school did not have the most recent version of the software so she could not. Another teacher asked how many ipods were available and he was told it was up to the buildings to buy them. Another teacher asked where they were going to post the podcasts and the school technician stated that they had not worked on that.

No matter how exciting a professional development is, the school district must have the supports in place to support that particular professional development before the actual professional development.

These teachers are excited about podcasting but disillusioned about actually using it. Will they give up on it before the technology supports are in place in the far future?

What happens in your district?

The Power of Visuals to Persuade: An Inconvenient Truth and Teachers’ Images

Last night I had the opportunity to watch Al Gore’s documentary, An Inconvenient Truth. I realized how powerful his visuals were. His images showed the impact of global warming through charts and through simulations. As he was talking, I did not doubt him but I felt unconvinced. However, as I saw a simulation of the impact of global warming on icecaps and the potential flooding in areas like Florida, I saw the horrible possible future. I was moved. His images were convincing.

 

I wonder how powerful are the images that teachers use in the classroom? Are they compelling images? Do those images move students to new view points? To greater understanding? To more higher level thinking skills? Or do they just decorate a presentation?

 

What is your truth about visuals in your classroom? Can they convince students as to what winter is the Northeast is like?

YouTube Shows Bad Teaching

In getting ready for a presentation, I spent several hours on YouTube. I found some amazing things for use in a classroom such as other students’ or classes’ production of Shakespeare.

However, the thing that shocked me the most was all the cellphone videos taken of teachers. Almost all of these depict teaching at its worst – boring, off of topic, wasting time, etc. From the descriptions I sense that the teachers were not aware of being recorded. It hurts to see such “bad” teaching. Maybe if we are thought that we were being recorded then we would teach better.

Flickr Hints, suggests that “You can’t take pictures of people and post them on the web without theirpermission – at least, that’s the position in the UK.”

Flickr Third Party Links for Classroom Use

Here are some Flickr links that you might find valuable for using Flickr in education

Flickr

http://www.flickr.com

 

FlickrLeech—see all of today’s thumbnails

http://www.flickrleech.net/

 

Flickstorm sorts by topic rather quickly

http://www.zoo-m.com/flickr-storm/

Woophy Geotagged flickr

http://www.woophy.com/map/index.php

Airtight Interactive –See other tagging connections

http://www.airtightinteractive.com/projects/related_tag_browser/app/

 

Add Bubbles to a Picture or Series of Pictures/ See Archives

http://www.pimpampum.net/bubblr/

 

Flickr Tools Listing

http://www.quickonlinetips.com/archives/2005/03/great-flickr-tools-collection/

 


RSS Education with Technology

  • Tech Integration Teacher, What time is it? August 23, 2016
    When someone asks what time it is, that person wants to know the time, not the history of the clock, not how a clock works, and not what other types of clocks there are. Classroom teachers want to help their students improve their academic learning through technology. Sometimes they need help with technology so they go […]
    hgtuttle
  • Curriculum Focus, Not Technology Focus July 28, 2016
    In my public school career I have been a classroom teacher, a technology integration specialist and a technology administrator. In my technology role, I served under the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction. She had a simple mission: Improve students’ academic learning. My mission was equally simple: Improve students’ academic learning through technology […]
    hgtuttle
  • Students React to Digital Badges: Pros, Cons and Interesting June 22, 2016
      ISTE 2016 By Harry Grover Tuttle, Ed. D. College World Language Students’ Preferences Digital Badges – 52%        Paper Certificates – 48% World Language: Can-Do Digital Badges Digital Badges Pro- – Breaks down proficiency more – Shows all badges at once – Is more attractive – Is more appropriate since we use […]
    hgtuttle
  • Digital Badges: Naming the Badge October 29, 2015
    Once teachers have selected what learning and what digital badges (individual or category badges; see previous blog), the teachers encounter another decision. What will they name each badge? Will they use the full name of the Common Core Standard or the national proficiency? For English, under “Speaking and Listening,”will they write out SL.2 “Integrate and […]
    hgtuttle
  • Digital Badges: Better Than Grades? October 19, 2015
    Teachers understand that the grade in a course consists of many different factors such as homework, participation , projects, tests, etc. Blodget observes that sometimes grades reflect attitude, effort, ability and behavior (http://www.academia.edu/9074119/Grading_and_Whether_or_not_Grades_Accurately_Reflect_Student_Achievement). Equally important, a letter […]
    hgtuttle
  • World Language Students Use of Mobile Devices in the Classroom October 5, 2015
    Do world language students use technology n the classroom? Do their  teachers go beyond having their students use technology simply for the drill and practice in vocabulary and grammar? Students can use laptops and mobile devices to hear authentic language, read authentic texts, read tweets about famous performers, see up-to-the-moment culture,  watch video […]
    hgtuttle
  • Digital Badges: Individual or Categorized Learning Badges? September 12, 2015
    The idea of digital badges sounds appealing for the digital children in classes. As teachers start thinking about digital badges, they have to figure out what badges will be awarded. The teachers can award social or academic badges. If teachers decide to use academic badges, then the teachers may base their badges on the Common […]
    hgtuttle
  • English +Common Core +Mobile = Success (ISTE2014 Poster -details) June 30, 2014
    Here are the ten examples I showed at my English + Common Core  + Mobile ISTE 2014 Poster Session: Based on CCSS Anchor Statements: L.2 Take a Conventions Mobile Online Quiz  to pick the  incorrect sentence from four choices (capitalization) SL.2  Evaluate audio recording of a  book chapter on mobile and predict for next chapter. […]
    hgtuttle
  • Global Cultural Learning Using Mobile Devices (ISTE Mobile MegaShare Presentation) June 28, 2014
    Based on my presentation at ISTE 2014 Mobile Megashare Why teach about other countries? Location: Large view to small on maps. Culture or culture. Find six similarities in a  mobile picture from another culture (“Wars are caused by differences, not similarities.”-Tuttle.) Tell one piece of information from each different Internet visual from a place in that […]
    hgtuttle
  • English + Common Core + Mobile = Success in Learning Poster Session at ISTE 2014 June 25, 2014
    In my ISTE Sunday 8-10 am poster session, I demonstrate many diverse mobile activities to help students achieve the English Language Arts Common Core Anchor Statements through mobile devices. The mobile activities focus on free common tool apps that are available on both the Android and the iPad. The students use the apps as a seamless […]
    hgtuttle

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