Archive for the 'Flickr' Category

Formative Assessment +Technology = Foreign Language Speaking Fluency ISTE 2012

Formative Assessment: continual improvement from where the modern language students are at present  to where we want them to be in their speaking through monitoring, giving feedback and providing time for improvement
Students speaking -> formative feedback ->  students speaking -> formative feedback -> speaking fluency

Technology: Motivates students since they talk about real things;  brings the  foreign language students’ world into the class and allows students to see the world of the new language area
Student talks about the teacher’s digital pictures or Flickr pictures  from target language area with question words data sheet
Student talks about the teacher’s digital pictures or Flickr pictures  from target language area  with a conversation data chart
Student talks about student taken picture posted to class Flickr account  for student’s number of consecutive sentences data list
Student talks about student taken picture  for conversation about last weekend with a conversation data chart
Student tells about his/her house using phone picture while partner monitors using a speaking chart
Student talks about a party, records it inVoki , moves it to wiki page where the student writes suggestions for improvement
Spreadsheet for analyzing students’ speaking per speaking function overtime.

Foreign Language / Modern Language Speaking Fluency (Spontaneous Speaking)  Students go from memorized sentences/dialogues to speaking spontaneously about common topics through scaffolded exercises that continually provide them with new speaking strategies. The students  demonstrate language fluency through speaking with minimal pauses about a new topic with no preparation.

Mobile learning (mlearning) Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL)

Two Youtube videos  on the importance of speaking in modern language class http://bit.ly/mlspeaking and of monitoring students’ speaking http://bit.ly/MLFAP2

A few technologies for modern language students to demonstrate their  speaking so they can receive feedback for improvement  Harry Grover Tuttle
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com
Pictures – on phone/mobile learning device
Picture + music Animoto
Picture + voice Voki (avatar), Fotobabble, Audioboo
Pictures + voice Yodio
Voice – phone call / leave a message
Voice recording – phone/ mobile learning device
Video recorded – – phone/ mobile learning device
Live video – Skype

Other resources:

Free Flickr Images for common vocabulary collected by my students for full info go to Blog, http://wp.me/p262R-De  1) Go to http://www.flickr.com, 2) click on the word Search, 3) click on Tags only, on the right side of the search box, 3) then, enter spancon +(subject) such as spancon +casa– search the blog for the full listing. No words, just pictures. Can be used in any language for quick vocabulary review using real objects and for speaking in short sentences.

Improving Foreign Language Speaking Through Formative Assessment. Larchmont, NY: Eye on Education. My book includes a procedure to assess all students in the class in just three minutes. It provides, for each of fifteen language functions such as socializing, asking for and giving information, and explaining, ten different speaking strategies to help students to improve. http://bit.ly/Tutbks.  Also, my Formative Assessment Responding to Your Students, and    Student Writing Through Formative Assessment books. If you did not get a discount for the books at the session, please email me.

My 20 Spanish spontaneous speaking activities such as Modified Speed Dating -AR verbs, Modified Speed Dating -Leisure/Sports, Spanish Conversation Topics- Partners, Multiple Sentences Board Game, Describing a friend, Talking about classes, Preterite Game & Speaking, and Clothing Spontaneous Speaking Mat are available for a nominal fee at Teacherspayteachers:  http://bit.ly/tpthtuttle

Search for modern language or foreign language on my blog https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com


Flickr Vocabulary Pictures Based on Real Objects For Your Class

I have been having my Spanish students take  real life pictures of vocabulary items  that are in our textbook and  put those pictures in my class Flickr  account. The textbook’s drawings lack realism (what is that?).  Most students used their Smartphones. When students can see a real object such as a plate, they can  better learn the word.

Elementary teachers, special education teachers, modern language  / foreign language teachers, ESL teachers, and   people working with refugees can use these pictures.   The pictures usually have no words.  They can be used in any language.

There are about 600 pictures ; some categories such as comida (food) are very large with subcategories while others have about  ten pictures.   I will update this blog as the students add more categories.

To use these free pictures in your class   1) go to flickr.com, 2) click on the word Search,  3) Click on Tags Only at the far right,   4) Then in the search box, type in spancon + one of the following category names such as spancon +hora  (for clocks showing various times). spancon is the name for my class so you only see my students’ pictures of the category.

To show the pictures in a slideshow,  1) click on the slideshow icon (a screen)  in the upper right, 2) Click on Options in the upper right, 3) Adjust the time from slow  to medium to fast; slow  is about seven seconds between slides and  4) click on the X in the upper right corner to close the  Option window.  When the left  bottom side displays a triangle, the slide show is paused.  Click on the triangle and two bars appear, the slideshow is running. The first  slide will not change for a few seconds since it is on a time delay; just wait.)  You can also just click on the pictures at the bottom of the slide show to show select pictures.  Students can identify the vocabulary and even say very short sentences before the slide changes.

The category names are in Spanish (without accent marks)
actividad (common actions)
aparato (electrical devices – phone, headphone..)
casa  (house)  with cuarto (rooms), bano (bathroom), and cocina (kitchen)
ciudad (city -mainly traffic things)
clase  (classroom objects)
clima (weather)
color (color)
comida (food) with subcategories of fruta (fruit) , verduras (vegetables), bebida (drink),
cubierto (tableware)
cuerpo (body)
deporte (sports)
hora (clock time- digital)
joyas (jewelry)
naturaleza (nature)
numero (numbers)
oficina (office things)
ocupacion (occupation, jobs=
reflexivo (reflexive actions such as to brush one’s teeth)
ropa (clothing)
salud (health related)
quehaceres (household chores

I have over 15 Spanish spontaneous speaking activities  are at Teacherspayteachers:  http://bit.ly/tpthtuttle

My formative assessment books, Formative Assessment: Responding to Your Students ; Successful Student Writing   Through Formative Assessment ; and Improving Foreign Language Speaking Through Formative Assessment , can be purchased at  http://is.gd/tbook

Students’ Web 2 school projects: Redoing to be Web 2.0

Much of  students’ Web 2.0 use is for   “drop and run” projects.  Where is read-write? Building on Others?  Collaboration?  Global?  Higher Level Thinking?

Many 2.0 tools

Some example of how to transform some to be more 2.0 and less 1.0.

Podcast/Voki/Audacity:   George Washington Example

Glogster / QR poster:  English writing

Images (Flickr, …):  Whale example

Videoconferencing/Skype:   Books

Video:   Shakespeare

Facebook/Twitter:  Paper Use

Others?

Tuttle’s formative assessment books:   http://is.gd/tbook

Web 2.0 Use May Not Be Formative Assessment

As I look at articles, blogs, and conference sessions, I see titles like

Formative Assessment Through Clickers

Formative Assessment Through Cell phones

Formative Assessment Through the Class Blogs/Wikis

Formative Assessment Through Online Quizzes

Formative Assessment Through Twitter

Formative Assessment Through Flickr

These people are generally  using Web 2.0 tools to monitor students, the first stage of formative assessment.  They collect information about where the students are  academically.

However, formative assessment moves from the monitor stage to the diagnosis stage.  How does the students’ present status compare to the desired learning goal?  If there are learning gaps, what strategies will help the students overcome those gaps?

If teachers or Web 2.0 programs do not offer improvement strategies based on the students’ specific learning gaps, then formative assessment does not occur.  Formative Assessment is much more than just seeing how many questions the students can answer;  it helps students to improve through providing new strategies for learning.

For example, if students take an online quiz about a certain learning goal, what happens next? Do the teachers diagnosis the results to see how individuals do on each item? Do the teachers determine which minor goals the students have yet to learn? Do the teachers determine which strategies will best help each student? Do the teachers give formative feedback to each student? Do the teachers build in class time for the students to practice their new formative strategy?  Do the teachers re-assess the learning?

Tuttle's Stages of Formative Assessment

Do you use Web 2.0 tools to go beyond the monitoring of students to a full formative assessment?

My book, Formative Assessment: Responding to Your Students, is available through Eye on Education.

Also, my  book,  Successful Student Writing Through Formative Assessment, is available through Eye on Education.

Integrating Culture into the Foreign Language Classroom Through Technology

I recently did a presentation in which I showed three ways to integrate culture into the Foreign Language/Modern Language classroom. Each way presents current daily culture.

The first  presentation focused on using Flickr photos to show the culture in a country. It demonstrates how to find images and how to create a cultural topic photo list.

Another presentation showed how to create an iGoogle foreign language website that will display much current culture (photos, weather, TV stations, news reports, etc.). The  information changes each day.

A third showed a process to allow students to do mini-cultural presentations on topics of interest to them.

My new book,  Successful Student Writing Through Formative Assessment, is available through Eye on Education.

Successful Student Writing Through Formative Assessment

My book, Formative Assessment: Responding to Your Students, is available through Eye on Education.

Reponding to Your Students

Assessing Learning with Web 2.0: Images/Visuals/Flickr

When we apply critical thinking to how we use images/photos/flickr in Web 2.0, we can assess how well our students communicate.

The following rubric applies the “Universal  Intellectual Standards” by  Linda Elder and and Richard Paul which was modified by Gerald Noisch in his Learning to Think Things Through.

Tuttle's Web 2.0 Assessment for Images
Tuttle’s Web 2.0 Assessment for Images

Flickr and learning: No new changes

I spent a few hours browsing Flickr to see if it had gained more educational groups than the last time I looked at learning and Flickr. I was sadden to see that there has not been a major increase in educational groups in flickr. I had hoped that composition teachers would have put together images for students’ writing. Maybe people do what I do and make their own list of images from Flickr. Maybe I am guilty as others in not giving back to Flickr what I have taken.

Also, if we all tag our images with educational terms, then others can search for them. At present, a search for educational terms ends with no images.

We have to be not only takers but also givers back. We can help build Flickr into an educational resource. Flickr can be a Web 2.0 tool.

Escuela- Hispanic School Pictures from Flickr

Share these with your Spanish teachers so they can promote language use through talking and writing about hispanic schools through flickr images.

Ninos a la salida de la escuela Punta Cana. Republica Dominicana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/burtonez/273321085/

la Escuela de Lenguaje en Las Palmas
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hortensia/186009195/

Escuela de Flamenco, Cordoba, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/barthelomaus/129380157/

escuela de uros, Lake Titicaca ,Peru
http://www.flickr.com/photos/28148072@N00/73302011/

Escuela Rural, Republica Dominicana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/74820634/

Estudiantes en la calle, San fermines, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/888581808/

escuela lic. “francisco aranda” Avenida Cedeño. San Juan de los Morros. Estado Guárico. Venezuela.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/xolkan/1294975980/

Escuela D190 12/2004, La Florida, Santiago, Chile
http://www.flickr.com/photos/monky/353105663/

Escuela D190 12/2004 La Florida, Santiago, Chile
http://www.flickr.com/photos/monky/353768937/

Educación autónoma y popular! Muro de la Escuela Autónoma Rebelde Zapatista en la comunidad de San Juan de la Libertad. Chiapas, Mexico
http://www.flickr.com/photos/joserevueltas/576088432/

Revista de Gimnasia Escuela N.o 3, Ovallito, Chile
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ovallito/45500626/

 

Powerful Learning Pictures from Flickr

I’ve been preparing some images to use in my Writing classes.  Flickr  has the biggest selection of high quality and of good vivid images.  There are many pictures that convey emotion as well as action and location. The advantage of being able to search helps to find the “right” image to use in the class for the particular purpose. I’ve made a word processing document of the picture URLs and the writing topics I’ll use the students for such as cause-and-effect and  process writing. I look forward to using exciting pictures in the classroom that will encourage the students to write.
How have you used Flickr images in your classroom?

Spanish Street (calle)Scenes Photos from Flickr

Here are a variety of hispanic streets. Please share with your Spanish teacher so that he/she can help the students to improve their speaking and writing through visuals.

CALLE

Calle de las flores, Andalucia, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/guijarro85/1172646698/

Calle Zamora decorada para la navidad, Salmanca, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/marioquartz/311952341/

Calle feliz, Iquitos Loreto Peru
http://www.flickr.com/photos/pierre_pouliquin/267491002/

Calle que lleva nuestro nombre, Montevideo, Uruguay
http://www.flickr.com/photos/car_tav/342443115/

Calle Obispo with the Hotel Ambos Mundos (Hemingway’s haunt), Havana, Cuba
http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulmannix/314096627/

Calle Santa Isabel, Madrid, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/photocapy/399184789/

Calle del leon (hisortia, Madrid, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nafria/411676144/

Fútbol en la Calle 26 de Marzo #8, Montevideo, Uruguay
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cuducos/1633470952/

Calle del diamante, Xalapa, Mexico
http://www.flickr.com/photos/63095335@N00/361694634/

Frutería. Calle San Esteban. Sevilla, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gonzalez-alba/1458921303/

A stall in Calle Heredia, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba
http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrycornelius/802221898/

Pinturas en la Calle El Conde, Santo Domingo, República Dominicana.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tecnorrante/99238955/

Other Spanish (Hispanic) images:

 

Spanish streets – Calle
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/10/30/spanish-street-callescenes-photos-from-flickr/

Spanish sports –Deporte
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/10/19/spanish-sport-deporte-pictures-from-flickr-for-student-conversations/

Spanish transportation Transportes
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/09/26/spanish-language-transportes-transportations-from-various-hispanic-countries/

Spanish restaurant Restaurante
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/09/16/restaurant-pictures-from-flickr-for-spanish-and-other-language-conversations/

If you have ideas you would like to share about the problems that students have in being fluent speakers and, if possible, the possible solutions, please add as a comment.  For example,  some students can not keep a conversation focused on the topic – a solution is to start them with a series of pictures about the topic or for them to focus on a specific problem such as an ordering problem in a restaurant.

Spanish Sport (Deporte) Pictures from Flickr for Student Conversations

Deportes – Please share with your Spanish teacher so he/she can have a source of pictures for classroom conversations about sports. Can the students ask 10 questions about the picture? Pretend to be someone in the picture describing what she/he is doing? Have two people in the picture having a discussion about what they are doing. Tell what was, is and will happen.

How will the teacher assess the students? How will the teacher give formative feedback to the students so that they can improve?

Marathon -Barcelona, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/fibercool/410396747/

Volibol – Buenos Aires, Argentina
http://www.flickr.com/photos/_alby2_/250976891/

Boats – puerto madero, Argentina
http://www.flickr.com/photos/johannrela/678281616/

ejercicio por bicicleta – Sevilla, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jom_tijola/536943658/

futbol – Pamplona, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hireen/400098788/

ciclismo, bicicletas – Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/soschilds/392414303/

Palacio de los deportes de Madrid, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/legumvra/1561180229/

Saltar del puente – Venezuela
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jmaldona/1105674787/

Correr – Nike10K
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmundaca/295897139/

Un ganador -sign Nogales, Mexico
http://www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/557232735/

Tienda de futbol -Madrid, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/villamota/52203130/

Kayak Race – Sevilla, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/z1on0110/846962635/

baloncesto – Madrid, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/vedia/103118224/

patinaje agresivo -Madrid, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/herzeleyd/1332655046/

 

Other Spanish (Hispanic images) for conversations or writing

Spanish streets – Calle
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/10/30/spanish-street-callescenes-photos-from-flickr/

Spanish sports –Deporte
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/10/19/spanish-sport-deporte-pictures-from-flickr-for-student-conversations/

Spanish transportation Transportes
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/09/26/spanish-language-transportes-transportations-from-various-hispanic-countries/

Spanish restaurant Restaurante
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/09/16/restaurant-pictures-from-flickr-for-spanish-and-other-language-conversations/

 

Spanish Language Menu
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/08/30/learning-hispanic-culture-through-spanish-language-menus/

If you have other flickr Spanish sports images to add, please put them in a comment.

If you have ideas you would like to share about the problems that students have in being fluent speakers and, if possible, the possible solutions, please add as a comment.  For example,  some students can not keep a conversation focused on the topic – a solution is to start them with a series of pictures about the topic or for them to focus on a specific problem such as an ordering problem in a restaurant.

 

 

Spanish Language Transportes (Transportations) From Various Hispanic Countries

As a Spanish teacher you can use the following Flickr images to show your students the variety of transportation in Spanish speaking countries. These images also provide great speaking and writing opportunities. If you do not teach Spanish, please share with your Spanish teacher. Gracias.

bus
El tranvia -Buenos Aires, Argentina
http://www.flickr.com/photos/91324818@N00/802535625

Transporte popular – Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hectorgarcia/512839552/

Transporte publico 2 Tijuana, Mexico
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rupertrocks/298421839/

Transporte ecologista-Malecón, Centro Habana, Cuba
http://www.flickr.com/photos/43732446@N00/119137013/

Transporte – aeropuerto, Madrid, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/517876985/

Transporte – Parque Tezozomoc, Azcapotzalco. Mexico
http://www.flickr.com/photos/subzonica/170853679/

Transporte publico taxco-Mexico
http://www.flickr.com/photos/reinitamateur/74845493/

Transporte publico -Monterrey, Mexico
http://www.flickr.com/photos/renguerra/4805782/

Servicio de bicicletas – Sevilla, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/torchondo/876183183/

El transporte -Habana, Cuba
http://www.flickr.com/photos/renguerra/4805782/

Medio de transporte-izabal, Guatemala
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cvander/8661198/

Imagen -transporte Valparaiso, Chile
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rjohnsonh/354884357/

What other flickr images have you found for Hispanic transportation?

Other Spanish (Hispanic images) for conversations or writing

Spanish streets – Calle
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/10/30/spanish-street-callescenes-photos-from-flickr/

Spanish sports –Deporte
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/10/19/spanish-sport-deporte-pictures-from-flickr-for-student-conversations/

Spanish restaurant Restaurante
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/09/16/restaurant-pictures-from-flickr-for-spanish-and-other-language-conversations/

 

Spanish Language Menu
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/08/30/learning-hispanic-culture-through-spanish-language-menus/

 

 

 

Restaurant Pictures From Flickr For Spanish and Other Language Conversations

Here are a few restaurant pictures from various Hispanic countries so that your Spanish students (and other students) can practice their conversation skills. If you are not a Spanish teacher, please share them with your Spanish teacher or other language teacher.

Restaurante rojo, Mexico
http://www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/557236325/

La Vita e Bella (Italian Restaurant en Madrid Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/97445131@N00/611503369/

El rico pulpo en Carballo, Espana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/comcinco/218469076/

Arte Vida en Espana (beach restaurant)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gaspars/442433335/

Desayuno 1 de enero,Colonia, Uruguay
http://www.flickr.com/photos/luisjoujr/86609684/

 

Calderitas, Mexico Restaurante
http://www.flickr.com/photos/seanlloyd/44106692/

Restaurante, Acapulco, Mexico
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bambino/225597017/

Restaurante , Buenos Aires, Argentina
http://www.flickr.com/photos/aldoalexandre/47880808/

If you know of online pictures of Hispanic restaurantes, please share.

Other Spanish (Hispanic images) for conversations or writing

Spanish streets – Calle
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/10/30/spanish-street-callescenes-photos-from-flickr/

Spanish sports –Deporte
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/10/19/spanish-sport-deporte-pictures-from-flickr-for-student-conversations/

Spanish transportation Transportes
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/09/26/spanish-language-transportes-transportations-from-various-hispanic-countries/

 

Spanish Language Menu
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/08/30/learning-hispanic-culture-through-spanish-language-menus/

 

 

 

Spanish-Language Restaurant Menus For Culture and Conversation

menu

The following is a list of Collective Commons (free to use in the classroom) pictures from Flickr that show various menus from Hispanic countries or locations that have Hispanic food. Students studying Spanish can come to understand the many different types of foods as well as the varieties within each type such as tacos. They can practice their ordering skills with real food and figure out their bill with real prices! Each web address is followed by a brief description.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/robennals/499187153/
Menu with Spanish and poor English translation +++

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/shyamh/148106511/
Menu Mexican divided by entrada, sopa, ensalada +++

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/flooznyc/430646028/
Mexican Food Deli Menu

http://www.flickr.com/photos/melaniewong/1155561698/
Yucatan Menu

http://www.flickr.com/photos/esotheos/208495024/
Taco restaurant menu

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rgabriel/514239426/
Menu with ceviche

http://www.flickr.com/photos/seyd/10746077/
Menu from Caribbean

http://www.flickr.com/photos/anjum/368254807/
Puerto Rican Menu (general info)

How do you help students to learn about the variety of Hispanic foods through menus? How do you bring the Hispanic world into your classroom through technology?

Other Spanish (Hispanic images) for conversations or writing

Spanish streets – Calle
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/10/30/spanish-street-callescenes-photos-from-flickr/

Spanish sports –Deporte
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/10/19/spanish-sport-deporte-pictures-from-flickr-for-student-conversations/

Spanish transportation Transportes
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/09/26/spanish-language-transportes-transportations-from-various-hispanic-countries/

 

Spanish Language Menu
https://eduwithtechn.wordpress.com/2007/08/30/learning-hispanic-culture-through-spanish-language-menus/

 

 

Nov. 2009 – If you are interested in trying out in your classroom some mini-speaking assessments (2-5) minutes that correspond to various parts of the ACTFL guidelines, please email me (harry.g.tuttle  at gmail) These short assessments  give you instant data/facts on your students’  present progress in speaking and you can re-administer these assessments  to see progress.  I have various assessments from vocabulary, asking and answering questions, asking critical questions about a topic, etc.  Let me know your level such as (Spanish 1- first year of Spanish).    Harry

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

 

—-

 

 

Textbook PowerPoint or Student Technologies

Textbook PowerPoints or Student Technologies

I heard about a young lady who has the graduate assistant job of creating PowerPoints for the chapters of a textbook that her prof is writing. Although I am sure that she is very good at creating PowerPoints that cover the main points in the chapter, I’m not sure that PowerPoints may be the best way to communicate the information in the textbook. Are there some YouTube videos that can demonstrate the concepts better? Would a class wiki about each chapter’s information allow the class to add other related information to the topic so that they build a class community of knowledge about the topic? Would a series of short podcasts allow the students to select which topic they needed more information about? Would a series of images from Flickr displayed on a whiteboard allow the class to interact more with the material?

These textbook PowerPoints are “teacher” created so information is being given to the students. Why not have the students generate their own information, debate issues within the topic, challenge each other’s views, and come to a greater understanding of the topic.

Is your class one with you as the teach deliver PowerPoints or one in which students create their own information through various technologies?

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

Improving Reading Skills With Technology

TechLearning

I wrote another article on improving reading skills through technology, Ramping Up Reading With Technology. There are fourteen different easy-to-apply techniques. Try these out in your classroom so that your students can be better readers! Although the examples are in English, many of these will work in ESL and World Language classes.

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

Flickr Resources for NECC

Flickr

Flickr
http://www.flickr.com

Creative Commons License (Free to use in the classroom) Shows photos that can be used by students and teachers as long as they give credit to the authors

http://flickr.com/creativecommons/by-nc-2.0/

 

FlickrLeech—see all of today’s thumbnails

http://www.flickrleech.net/

 

 

Topical and Tag Sorting

Flickstorm sorts by topic rather quickly

http://www.zoo-m.com/flickr-storm/

 


Airtight Interactive
–See other tagging connections

http://www.airtightinteractive.com/projects/related_tag_browser/app/


Tagnautica shows the associated tags
and images

http://www.quasimondo.com/tagnautica.php

 

 

Geography

Often teachers want to have pictures of a certain location for their classes. The tools built around Flickr provide easy access to geographically based photos. Bring the world into your class and take your students into the world outside the classroom through using Flickr!

Woophy Geotagged flickr
http://www.woophy.com/map/index.php

 

FlickrMap locates flickr pictures on a world map
http://www.flickrmap.com/

 

Loc.alize.us – Search for an image in the world
http://loc.alize.us/#/geo:0,0,2,k/

 

Mappr Type in a tag and see on the US map where the most recent photos on that tag are located
http://www.mappr.com/mappr.phtml?

 

Educational Uses:

Add Bubbles to a Picture or Series of Pictures/ See Archives

http://www.pimpampum.net/bubblr/

 

Captioner– Add a speech bubble to an image

http://shadydentist.com/captioner/index.php

 

Spell out words with Flickr pictures
http://metaatem.net/words

 


Guess the common tag-Fastr

http://randomchaos.com/games/fastr/

 

Matchr- Match images with the same tag

http://photomesh.cs.northwestern.edu/matchr/puzzle.php

 

Demonstrate meaning of a word

http://www.wordmingle.com/

 

Phasr- Type in a phrase and see a picture for each word. Can change the image.

http://www.pimpampum.net/phrasr/

There are some phrases in the archives.

 

Fillustrator – type in a phrase and see a picture for each word. Can change the images.

http://www.imagine-it.org/flickr/flillustrator.htm

 

Visual Dictionary – can pick topic and year

http://steeev.f2o.org/flickr/time.php

 

 

 

SlideShows

 

Down pictures for a slideshow

http://flickrslideshow.fateback.com/

 


Flickstorm
sorts by topic rather quickly

http://www.zoo-m.com/flickr-storm/

 


Flickr Large SlideShow
– Online Slide Show (large or default)

http://www.tinou.com/flickrslideshow.jsp

 


Online Slide Show
select tag

http://bighugelabs.com/flickr/slideshow.php

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flickr Resources – Groups Within Flickr

5 sentence minimum stories

http://www.flickr.com/groups/stories/

 

Classroom displays

http://www.flickr.com/groups/classrmdisplays/

 

Flickr in Educ group

http://www.flickr.com/groups/flickredu/

 

Your ideas for using Flickr in your classroom?

 

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

 

 

 

 

Professional Development NECC Workshops- “Hands on” or “Brains On”

NECC 2007

I’m finalizing my presentations for NECC (2 workshops and 1 session). Conducting a workshop is an interesting game. People want to learn new information. They want to practice it. However, they often do not want to spend time in workshops which focus more on developing new thinking skills involving technology than on the actual “technology.” I tend to give “brains on” workshops instead of “hands on” workshops. I always build in time for people to think about the new skill such as using Flickr and to plan how to integrate it into their classroom. Yet at this most critical time, the actual implementation of the skill, is when many participants zone out or leave. Usually I build in time to for them to share their implementation ideas with another participants so that they can get feedback. Participants often do not want feedback.

If I show them sites all during workshops, they are happy. However, when I stop and ask them to seriously think about how they will use this technology to improve student learning, I find their interest descending quickly.

Do we want our students to be “show and tell” or “show and think”? Do we think about the hard questions about technology use so that we use the technology in a way that truly benefits our students learning? Or do we just want to learn the technology?

————–

Reading for Meaning Through Technology

Reading T-chart

When I was in middle school and high school, I remember that reading Social Studies and Science textbooks was a matter of finding the answer in the passage. For the math textbook, I had to understand and solve problems by applying the formula or concept. For the English textbooks, I had to do literary analysis, a very specific type of reading. There was the textbook and myself, sometimes a weak combination.

So how do we help students to read for meaning today through the use of technology?

Do we

Model our thinking process as we read a passage to the students? An English teacher may ask “If Don Quixote becomes crazy by reading books, will we become crazy by watching tv?” We can digitally record this thinking for the first chapter of the book and then have students record their thinking aloud for subsequent chapters. These digital recordings can become podcasts or web movies that capture the deep thinking in the reading.

Have students answer questions as they go through the text, readings, or websites? In Social Studies, a question can be “What other rivers have been the center of civilizations?” In Science, a question may be ” What other reactions have required heat? Why?” Students can respond in a class blog so that students can see the many possible answers.

Ask students to compare/contrast what they are reading to a previous reading using a T-chart in a Word chart form or in an Inspiration-like form? In what ways are Don Quixote and A Midsummer Night’s Dream similar?

Assign students to find images that prove the idea that they are talking about using Google or Flickr? Images of “bread” from around the world show the universal need for food.

Ask students high-level thinking questions about the topic and have them respond with a personal response system. Sancho is most like which other sidekick? A- B- C- D-

Have them use a Smartboard-like device to underline all the words that show the same meaning or emphasis? Students can read a website passage and underline all the words or phrases that show the author’s bias.

How else do you have your students read for deep meaning through technology? Share your ideas. If I get them within the week, I might include them in an article I’m writing on reading and technology.

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

—–

Flickr and Geographically Based Photos for Your Class

Often teachers want to have pictures of a certain location for their classes. The tools built around Flickr provide easy access to geographically based photos. Bring the world into your class and take your students into the world outside te classroom through using Flickr!

Woophy Geotagged flickr
http://www.woophy.com/map/index.php

FlickrMap locates flickr pictures on a world map
http://www.flickrmap.com/

Loc.alize.us – Search for an image in the world
http://loc.alize.us/#/geo:0,0,2,k/

Mappr Type in a tag and see on the US map where the most recent photos on that tag are located
http://www.mappr.com/mappr.phtml?

As a Spanish teacher talks about Madrid, she can show images from there. As a Social Studies teacher engages students in South American geography, he can show pictures of the Andes Mountains (villages and people). As an English teacher has the students write poems about a type of geography such as lake, they can look at Flickr images from various locations as a writing prompt. As a Science teacher explains volcanic action, she can show students various locations that have a volcano.

Have you found your way to using geotagged pictures in your classroom yet? Are there other Flickr tools you use to use geotagged images in your classroom?

 

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

——————

Flickr – Student Learning by Associating Categories (Tags)

Nautica tagging for Flickr

There are several Flickr programs that allow you and your students to find tags associated or clustered with the initial tag you searched for.


Flickstorm sorts by topic rather quickly – bottom half has tags

http://www.zoo-m.com/flickr-storm/


Airtight Interactive Type in a term, see images about the term and see connections

http://www.airtightinteractive.com/projects/related_tag_browser/app/

Tagnautica shows the associated tags and images (my favorite visual association so far)
http://www.quasimondo.com/tagnautica.php

Flickr clustering allows for clustering of ideas so that “bill” can be clustered in numerous ways. Type in the tag and then click on cluster
http://flickr.com/photos/tags/bill/clusters

This can be a great educational game for your students. You think of a tag like ice for your science unit and then you ask the students to list all the related tags (categories) that they can think of. Then type “ice” into one of the above and compare the tags to the students. Have the students determine which are science categories and which are non-scientific categories. This type of inference thinking helps to broaden the students’ thinking and helps them to think in terms of connections instead of one isolated term. They have to compare and contrast tags.

So how do you have you students develop tag (category) building through Flickr?

 

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

——————–

 

 

 

Music Learning To a Higher Beat Through Technology

music notes

Music teachers have many wonderful technology resources that can help their students. Here are a few.

Podcast
Student interviews another student about her music -Kingswood #3
http://www.podcast.net/show/62943
Your students can explain their musical compositions before they play them.

YouTube
David Honeyboy Edwards Youtube music blues in a shoebox http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i441yw-ns9I

Thelonius Monk in Berlin 4:12
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EywdPsnJxQ

Tons of student made music videos to critic

Have your explain how to do something in music through an emovie (you can post it to YouTube for the world to see)

Has your class been Youtubed (blog entry) Search to see choir, instrumental, etc. http://etobiasblog.musiced.net/2007/01/03/has-your-music-classroom-been-youtubed/

Flickr
Have students sing or write a song based on a picture from Flickr. Or give the class the same general topic (family) and have them pick a picture from within that topic for their music.

Have students select pictures to illustrate a song or instrumental piece. They compare their pictures and explain their understanding of the piece.

Graphic Organizers/Inspiration
Students show the historical connections, cultural connections, famous artists, famous examples, time period, and characteristics for a style of music.

Videoconferencing
Have your choir learn how to sing a song in French from a French choir, sing it for them, and sing it with them.

Your students can watch up close as a famous instrumentalist plays. The students can play and the expert can give them constructive feedback.

Software/Online resources
Free Finale Notepad to create music http://www.finalemusic.com/

Elementary Music Bulletin Boards http://www.musicbulletinboards.net/

Music resources http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Music/home_music.html

So how do music teachers involve students in their music learning through technology in your district? How do they use interactive technology to improve the quality of music learning?

 

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

—–

 

 

 

Art Beautifully Drawn by Terrific Technology

Art and technology

Art teachers have many valuable technology resources that they can use to improve their students’ learning.

Blogs
Walter’s Art Museum Director’s Blog
http://www.thewalters.org/blog/

Museum of Glass blog African-American quilting entry
http://museumofglass.org/blogs/art/2006/06/african-american-quilting/

PDF of Art Museum Blogs by Ideum
http://www.ideum.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/03/museumblogs3-6-06.pdf

 

Podcast
Moma Museum Blog Jackson Pollock’s Echo Number 25
http://www.podcast.net/show/16821

 

YouTube
Cubism Explanation and Watch student drawing 2:00 minutes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQl_JLt7UJg

Videoconferencing
Virtual visit with a museum or an artist -great source is CILC

Flickr
Students analyze a story told in four pictures and create their own visual story.

So how else do your art teachers use technology n their classrooms?

 

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

——————

 

 

 

Technology-Infused Learning: Restricted or Scaffolded Learning?

( learning)

( learning ….Learning….LEArning……LEARNing…..LEARNING)

I had a talk with a teacher who decided to incorporate technology into her unit.  She decided what activities she wanted the students to do and then she fit the technology into those activities.  She was working with countries of the world.  She wanted each student to do a report on a country.  She decided that they would gather the information from the library’s encyclopedias and then her students would prepare a PowerPoint presentation of the country’s information. It was to be all words.

I had a talk with another teacher who decided to incorporate technology into her unit. She decided what particular standard she wanted her students to practice.  She and I discussed various activities and various technologies that might help scaffold the learning for her students.  She decided to have the students select five images for their chosen country from Flickr/Woophy and then for them to describe the variety of geography in a PowerPoint. They would use those five images to tell the different geography and how it might influence life in that country. 

Have you talked with your technology integration teacher or Library Media Specialist recently to see new ways of using technology-infused learning to scaffold learning for your students?

Flickr Third Party Links for Classroom Use

Here are some Flickr links that you might find valuable for using Flickr in education

Flickr

http://www.flickr.com

 

FlickrLeech—see all of today’s thumbnails

http://www.flickrleech.net/

 

Flickstorm sorts by topic rather quickly

http://www.zoo-m.com/flickr-storm/

Woophy Geotagged flickr

http://www.woophy.com/map/index.php

Airtight Interactive –See other tagging connections

http://www.airtightinteractive.com/projects/related_tag_browser/app/

 

Add Bubbles to a Picture or Series of Pictures/ See Archives

http://www.pimpampum.net/bubblr/

 

Flickr Tools Listing

http://www.quickonlinetips.com/archives/2005/03/great-flickr-tools-collection/

 

Flickr vs Google: Educational Application Analysis

The following chart shows a quick analysis of Flickr vs Google for using in an educational setting.
At this time Google has more images but the last few pages of Google images probably contain many icons or non-instructional images. Flickr’s images are more realistic and better resolution but they contain more “see Juan at the falls” type images than Google. Flickr has a growing number of third party apps that promise to make it much more powerful such as geo-tagging in woophy. Which is better for the classroom? I would select Flickr.

Woophy and Flickr: Finding a Good Visual in Time?

woophy.jpg

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then how long should a teacher or student search for a meaningful image to communicate an idea?

Yes, Flickr has a search engine.

Yes, Woophy searches Flickr through a map or a search.

There are a host of other searching flickr sites.

Flickr is a wonderful site that contain many images. However, the question still remains how long will a teacher or student be searching for an image?

 

I’ve been preparing a presentation on Visual Literacy and I’ve been using Flickr. I can verify that I have spent much time in finding the image that communicates the idea I want. For example, I want to give a quick overview of the geography of Mexico. When I search Woophy for Mexico, geography there are 102 images. Many of them do not show geography; for example, I see racing cars, models, traffic jams, a wall, etc. It is the search engine that is showing me geography or Mexico? It is that the pictures were tagged with geography? There is no way to see all of the images at once so I have to scroll down and see ten and then scroll to the next ten. Eventually I found what I needed but it took a long time. Do teachers and students have that much time in the classroom?

A Flickr Fliction: Not Bright Enough for Me

A Flickr Fliction: Not Bright Enough for Me

When I started teaching Spanish in 1968, I used transparency pictures for class writing, conversations, oral comprehension and quizzes on a daily basis. (The overhead was a new technology back then!) Yes, it was a big pain to find the right picture from magazines or newspaper and then to make transparencies of the pictures. Yes, sometimes the transparencies melted (cheap transparencies and hot overhead machines). Also, I used a slide projector to show cultural pictures that I had taken in Spanish speaking countries. In 1975, I wrote an article (“Using Visual Material in the Foreign Language Classroom” Learning Resources, Vol 2-5 ,Feb. 1975, 9-13) on improving students’ language and cultural skills through fifty uses of visuals in the Foreign Language classroom. In addition, I mailed (not emailed) pictures of our area to students in Spanish speaking countries who asked us questions about our area. I made handouts of pictures for students to use in a variety of group activities within the classroom.

 

The basic educational concept has not changed throughout the years. Many students are visual learners and they react well to visual images. Can you say Millenial students? The students are engaged when visuals are used.

 

So, what would I like from Fliction? I want it to do more than I could do with the overhead, slides, handouts or mailing pictures. I want a more powerful learning technology. So far, based on the two presentations I have seen on Fliction, I have only seen one story attached to one specific picture and one comment on that writing. What about multiple stories to one picture? What about “continue my story” approach?What about two contrasting pictures to create higher level learning about a topic? What about a series of pictures showing a local community or topic? What about multiple comments to the multiple stories? What about a dialogue between the picture presenter and the story writer? What about writers role playing different people in the picture and having a conversation. For example, in above picture which I took are the two people happy or sad? What are they saying to each other? What are they saying about their location? How might the location represent their relationship?

Visuals are rich learning resources. I want students to have rich responses to them and to be able to respond to the pictures easily.

 

I’ll wait for a better developed learning-embedded technology image than Fliction. I’ll wait for a brighter use of technology to help students express their in depth ideas.

 


RSS Education with Technology

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