Archive for June, 2007



Effective Student Learning System with Technology

 

I’m in Atlanta for the NECC conference. I am impressed with the public transportation system, a quick and efficient way to get to a location in Atlanta. Each stop is clearly marked.

I wonder how we provide our students with a quick and effective system to get to their learning. How often do we teach students information that they have learned in previous grades? Do we pre-test our students? We can manually correct the pre-tests, use the quiz part of course ware programs, or use a free online survey program. Do we modify our lesson plans when we see the results of the pre-test so we are providing new learning?

I wonder how we scaffold our lessons so that students thoroughly learn the initial material and then we help them climb up to the higher levels of thinking? Do we use targeted technology activities that focus on higher and higher level thinking? Or do all of our technology-infused activities remain at the same level of thinking?

I wonder how we let our students know their progress? Do we use a grading program or course ware that allows students access to their grades at any time? Do we use grading program or course ware that allows us to rate the students’ progress in the standards and that the students can access any time?

How quick and effective is your learning system for your students?

 

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

 

 

Making learners better learners with verified student profiles

I met someone who is a semi-professional photographer. She does not just see a flower, she sees the flower’s story. She looks beyond the outer surface flower to find out the inner real-story of the flower.

I thought about the students I have had. Yes, I knew whether they did their homework, their scores on tests and quizzes, what their handwriting looked like, and how quickly they finished an in class assignment. However, I knew little about them as learners. I did not know their academic strengthens: Were they better at writing poetry or narratives? Did they needed to take notes as they listened to information or could they just remember it? What strategies did they use when they had to write an essay? How did they organize information for a report? I wished I had developed a learner profile so that I could better help my students.

If students completed an online learner profile (even just a word processed document) and we could check their ideas about how they learn with how they actually learn in our classes, we could help each student to be a better learner. We could build on their actual strengthens and improve on those that do not seem to be working. We could add our responses to the students’ word processed document ( category- their response) and talk with them about how to be better learners. Without successful learning strategies our students can not improve in their subject area learning.

 

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

 

Making YouTube Videos From the Digital Camera- Lessons Learned

YouTube

Usually you can take a movie directly from your digital camera and upload it directly to YouTube type programs. Check on how your camera save movies. The formats of .mov/ .avi work fine.

The following will make your YouTube movie work better:
Have strong solid content
Storyboard what the camera will see and hear
Practice it several times
Have a visual or an oral introduction to the topic
Have all your props ready and in their correct order
Use close ups whenever possible to focus on the objects or actions
Have a solid color non-distracting background
Avoid background noises
Speak loudly and clearly
Keep all actions focused on the learning standard, not on comic relief
Keep the camera movement steady even if you are moving the camera
If your first try does not work, do it again. It is easier to reshoot than to edit it.
Learn from your mistakes and make each video better.
Have each group in the class make an instructional video about the topic

What have your learned from doing a YouTube type video?

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

Reading in the 21st Century

Reading on Computer

I wonder what “reading” means for the 21st century. Does it mean

Getting information from images, graphs and charts, as well as text?

Skimming for links on webpages as well as reading left to right word for word? (I’m sure students read more online than they do offline.)

Following webpage links to more in-depth information about the topic?

Writing down sticky-note comments on the electronic text as a person reads it and those comments are available for others to see?

Questioning the author through emails, blogs, and videoconferencing?

Blogging or videoconferencing with others about the meaning of the text? (Book clubs/literature circles online)

Comparing other sources of the same information such as looking at the same news story from newspapers of several countries?

Writing information to a WIKI about other stories with the same theme, location, or problem?

Getting cultural information that helps in the understanding of the reading material from a person in that country? What would a person from Colombia tell about Hernando Téllez’ “Just Lather, That’s All”?

Reading 50% or more of non-fiction?

Decoding text messages?

Determining the authenticity of the reading material?

Being able to build or do something as a result of reading instructions?

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

70% Not Focused/Not Efficient Technology Integration

I would guess that 70% of all technology-infused learning experiences are not focused on a specific standard component or do not use technology effectively.

A teacher who has her students produce autobiographies using digital camera and word progress or software is certainly doing English Language Arts but probably the teacher is not focusing on the particular skills that are needed for the state ELA assessment. When two librarians videoconference and read a book to each other’s group, they are not focused on the state ELA assessment unless they ask meaningful questions about the books.

Likewise, when a class spends five days on doing a podcast about a battle in the US Civil War, they are not focusing on the state assessment (DBQs). They could do a quick Inspiration comparison chart about the war and learn just as much. The technology does not support the real learning purpose. In addition, when a class has a blog in which students talk about the story they have read, they may be missing the individual analysis that could be done just as easily through word processing. The word processing is more similar to what they will do on their state assessment.

How well does your technology use support the state standards as expressed on the state assessment?

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007

Professional Development NECC Workshops- “Hands on” or “Brains On”

NECC 2007

I’m finalizing my presentations for NECC (2 workshops and 1 session). Conducting a workshop is an interesting game. People want to learn new information. They want to practice it. However, they often do not want to spend time in workshops which focus more on developing new thinking skills involving technology than on the actual “technology.” I tend to give “brains on” workshops instead of “hands on” workshops. I always build in time for people to think about the new skill such as using Flickr and to plan how to integrate it into their classroom. Yet at this most critical time, the actual implementation of the skill, is when many participants zone out or leave. Usually I build in time to for them to share their implementation ideas with another participants so that they can get feedback. Participants often do not want feedback.

If I show them sites all during workshops, they are happy. However, when I stop and ask them to seriously think about how they will use this technology to improve student learning, I find their interest descending quickly.

Do we want our students to be “show and tell” or “show and think”? Do we think about the hard questions about technology use so that we use the technology in a way that truly benefits our students learning? Or do we just want to learn the technology?

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Transfer of Learning: Thorough and Diverse

A critical condition before students can transfer their learning is that they they understand the material thorough and in-depth and that they can apply their learning in diverse conditions. If students have not mastered the initial skill, then they will not be able to transfer it to another situation.

Have your students learned subject area information in a comprehensive and in-depth (Application or higher of Bloom’s levels)? Do they know more than surface information ( the mere facts about an event or situation)? Can your Modern Language students do more than list the vocabulary words for shopping? Can they create spontaneous conversations about various shopping situations? Can your Social Studies students do more than list the generals in the US Civil War? Can they compare the reasons for the US Civil War to other Civil Wars? Can they compare the results of the US Civil War to other Civil Wars?

Do we use technology to help the students to learn our subject area thoroughly and indepth and in diverse ways. Social Studies teachers can easily find information on other civil wars for the students to compare the US Civil War to. They can talk with students in one of these countries through email or videoconferencing (Skype or bigger videconferencing systems.

Help your students to be able to transfer their learning so that their learning is not pigeoned-holed but applicable to many other learning situations.

© Harry Grover Tuttle, 2007


RSS Education with Technology

  • English +Common Core +Mobile = Success (ISTE2014 Poster -details) June 30, 2014
    Here are the ten examples I showed at my English + Common Core  + Mobile ISTE 2014 Poster Session: Based on CCSS Anchor Statements: L.2 Take a Conventions Mobile Online Quiz  to pick the  incorrect sentence from four choices (capitalization) SL.2  Evaluate audio recording of a  book chapter on mobile and predict for next chapter. […]
    hgtuttle
  • Global Cultural Learning Using Mobile Devices (ISTE Mobile MegaShare Presentation) June 28, 2014
    Based on my presentation at ISTE 2014 Mobile Megashare Why teach about other countries? Location: Large view to small on maps. Culture or culture. Find six similarities in a  mobile picture from another culture (“Wars are caused by differences, not similarities.”-Tuttle.) Tell one piece of information from each different Internet visual from a place in that […]
    hgtuttle
  • English + Common Core + Mobile = Success in Learning Poster Session at ISTE 2014 June 25, 2014
    In my ISTE Sunday 8-10 am poster session, I demonstrate many diverse mobile activities to help students achieve the English Language Arts Common Core Anchor Statements through mobile devices. The mobile activities focus on free common tool apps that are available on both the Android and the iPad. The students use the apps as a seamless […]
    hgtuttle
  • English Common Core Mobile Activities ebook June 18, 2014
    I recently published English Common Core Mobile Activities ebook. Use these 150+ different mobile activities to guide your students in learning and demonstrating the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Anchor Statements in Language, Speaking and Listening, Reading, and Writing. The activities, organized by Anchor Statements, actively eng […]
    hgtuttle
  • Giving Students a Voice in App Selection January 8, 2014
    Traditionally, teachers research apps for their class. They assign apps to students.  The teachers assign a specific app or give students a choice of several pre-selected apps.  As a Modern Language teacher, I suggested apps to my students in the early part of the year. However, in January, I let my students select which apps […]
    hgtuttle
  • Considering Home Learning When Doing Mobile December 14, 2013
    Many schools are going mobile or one-to-one.  Schools sometimes make decisions without thinking about the full consequences such as mobile and home learning. If schools supply mobile devices to the students, do the students take the mobile devices home?   If students do not take the mobile device home, then mobile is only considered an […]
    hgtuttle
  • Good Apps vs Very Good Apps November 5, 2013
    Good mobile learning practice apps  facilitate and transform learning. Mobile learning activities can  increase students’ time on task.  In a classroom, a teacher calls on one student  after another but no student is active all the time; only those who are called on are active. Students remain  off task for much of the time since […]
    hgtuttle
  • Group Texting Programs: The Next Big Wave? October 10, 2013
    Group texting programs fall into two categories.  The first category consists of teacher- to-student text programs such as Reminder 101, . In these programs, the teacher sends out  text reminders, announcements, notes, etc. to the whole class with just a click of button. These programs are teacher -centered since the teacher pushes out information but […] […]
    hgtuttle
  • Assessment and Mobile Learning Questions September 10, 2013
    Technology can play a critical role in the learning process.  Here are some questions about assessment and mobile learning to think about as you plan for your mobile learning. Who/ What  will assess the students’ mobile learning? A) the same mobile app that the student worked on B) a  different mobile app C)  the teacher […]
    hgtuttle
  • How will students’ mobile device be used for learning? September 2, 2013
    How will the  students’ mobile device primarily be used? What other ways can teachers have students use mobile devices to engage in  learning? to introduce the learning goal to the students  before the teacher does in class  such as in a flipped classroom to introduce the learning goal during the class presentation to present alternative […]
    hgtuttle

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